Beyond The Ego: 6 Ways To Replace Mental Clutter With Happiness

Source: finerminds.com ~ By
ego

Each of us has two voices that, from the moment we wake up to the moment we fall asleep, speak to us. One of the voices shouts; the other voice whispers. They lurch behind you like a shadow and give conflicting advice. One is the Ego; the other is the Higher Self

What is the Ego?

It is your reactive, attached mind. Holding onto the past and worrying about the future, it is the self-deprecating voice that tells you that you are a victim of circumstance. The Ego cannot create; it only reacts. “The world is random and accidental, and so is your life,” the Ego says. The Ego is the cause of all pride and insecurity. Luckily, you have another voice to follow – your Higher Self.

What is the Higher Self?

I guess you could call it your intuition, but it is actually much more. We all have an inner guide, the eternal part of our being that is not restricted to time, space or external circumstances. This guide is our Higher Self, and gives us wisdom beyond our intelligence and helps us overcome the Ego’s self-imposed limitations. How do you find your Higher Self? By shutting up, surrendering the Ego’s agenda, and listening.

“When Ego is lost, limit is lost.” –Yogi Bhajan

Our Ego talks a lot. Loudly. And most of what it tells us, including thoughts of worry and doubt, is mental clutter. If we’re not careful, we can mistake the Ego’s lies for truth.

Below are six lies the Ego tells us, and comebacks from the Higher Self that will replace the Ego’s mental clutter with happiness.

Beyond The Ego: 6 Ways To Replace Mental Clutter With Happiness

Do you want to be more creative? Do you want a career that aligns with your purpose? If so, the first step is mastering your Ego.

Mastering your Ego means trusting your intuition even when every external signal points to the contrary. The Ego cannot be mastered overnight. It will push, pull and cry like a baby for your attention. But if you remain alert to the clutter of your mind, listening to your Ego but never identifying with it, the results – including happiness, success and creativity – are worth the fight.

10 Important Reasons to Start Making Time for Silence, Rest and Solitude

Source: huffingtonpost.com ~ Author: Thai Nguyen
It’s amazing how tuned out we become to the motor of the air-conditioner and refrigerator — the sudden silence is a startling reprieve. Likewise, we become numb to the buzz of our technology saturated world.

Smartphone users check their device every 6.5 minutes, which works out to around 150 times a day. Silence is replaced with a cacophony of communication, and solitude is replaced with social media.

Indeed they’re an endangered species: silence and solitude; yet great revelations and benefits are found in them. Here are ten:

1. Bypassing Burnout
Too often, our culture assigns self-worth with productivity. Whether it’s asking what your country can do for you, or what you can do for your country, the question remains — what can be done? It’s a one-way ticket to burnout.

Solitude allows for a break from the tyrant of productivity. And rather than being in opposition, doing nothing helps with doing much. Promega is a company with on-the-job “third spaces” where employees are able to take solitude breaks and meditate in natural light. The health benefits have resulted in improved productivity levels for the company. And will do the same for us.

2. Heightened Sensitivity 
For many, attempting ten days of silence would be akin to walking on water. Vipassana silent retreats are exactly that; participants are instructed to refrain from reading, writing, or eye contact.

One hundred scientists went on a retreat for research and noted that shutting off the faculty of speech heightens awareness in other areas. Beginning with breathing, that focus and sensitivity is then transferred to sights, sounds, sensations, thoughts, intentions, and emotions.

3. Dissolving Tomorrow’s Troubles 
Alan Watts argues that our frustration and anxiety is rooted in being disconnected — living in the future, which is but an illusion.

Silence brings our awareness back to the present — where concrete happiness is experienced. Watts makes the distinction between our basic and ingenious consciousness; the latter makes predictions based on our memories, which seem so real to the mind that we’re caught in a hypothetical abstraction. It plans out our lives with an abstract happiness, but an abstract happiness is a very real disappointment.

The future falls short of what the present can deliver. Silence and solitude pulls us out and immerses us back in the present.

4. Improves Memory
Combining solitude with a walk in nature causes brain growth in the hippocampus region, resulting in better memory.

Evolutionists explain that being in nature sparks our spatial memory as it did when our ancestors went hunting — remembering where the food and predators were was essential for survival. Taking a walk alone gives the brain uninterrupted focus and helps with memory consolidation.

5. Strengthens Intention and Action
Psychologist Kelly McGonigal says during silence, the mind is best able to cultivate a form of mindful intention that later motivates us to take action.

Intentional silence puts us in a state of mental reflection and disengages our intellectual mind. At that point McGonigal says to ask yourself three questions:

  • “If anything were possible, what would I welcome or create in my life?”
  • “When I’m feeling most courageous and inspired, what do I want to offer the world?”
  • “When I’m honest about how I suffer, what do I want to make peace with?”

Removing that critical mind allows the imagination and positive emotions to build a subconscious intention and add fuel to our goals. McGonigal explains, “When you approach the practice of figuring this stuff out in that way, you start to get images and memories and ideas that are different than if you tried to answer those questions intellectually.”
6. Increases Self-Awareness
The visceral reaction of cussing at a loved one or over-disciplining our children often comes with regret. It happens when we’re completely governed by actions, and absent of reasonable thought.

In silence, we make room for the self-awareness to be in control of our actions, rather than under their control. The break from external voices puts us in tune to our inner voices — and it’s those inner voices that drive our actions. Awareness leads to control.

Practice becoming an observer of your thoughts. The human will is strengthened whenever we choose not to respond to every actionable thought.

7. Grow Your Brain
The brain is the most complex and powerful organ, and like muscles, benefits from rest. UCLA research showed that regular times set aside to disengage, sit in silence, and mentally rest, improves the the “folding” of the cortex and boosts our ability to process information.

Carving out as little as 10 minutes to sit in your car and visualize peaceful scenery (rainforest, snow-falling, beach) will thicken grey matter in your brain.

8. “A-Ha” Moments
The creative process includes a crucial stage called incubation, where all the ideas we’ve been exposed to get to meet, mingle, marinate — then produce a eureka or “A-ha” moment. The secret to incubation? Nothing. Literally; disengage from the work at hand, and take a rest. It’s also the elixir for mental blocks.

What’s typically seen as useless daydreaming is now being seen as an essential experience. Professor Jonathan Schooler from UC Santa Barbara says, “Daydreaming and boredom seem to be a source for incubation and creative discovery in the brain.”

9. Mastering Discomfort
Just when you’ve found a quiet place to sit alone and reflect, an itch will beckon to be scratched. But many meditation teachers will encourage you to refrain, and breath into the experience until it passes. Along with bringing your mind back from distracting thoughts and to your breathing, these practices during silence and solitude work to build greater self-discipline.

10. Emotional Cleansing
Our fight/flight mechanism causes us to flee not only from physical difficulties, but also emotional difficulties. Ignoring and burying negative emotions however, only causes them to manifest in stress, anxiety, anger, and insomnia.

Strategies to release emotional turbulence include sitting in silence and thinking in detail about what triggered the negative emotion. The key is to do so as an observer — stepping outside of yourself as if you’re reporting for a newspaper. It’s a visualization technique used by psychotherapists to detach a person from their emotions, which allows you to process an experience objectively and rationally.

Newsletter, 11/10/2014

 

Time Freedom, Money to Live and Health to Play!

This really brings to light my own personal story and my passion.

My Dad retired at 55 years old with an amazing pension from a corporation he worked for – for 35 years. Oh for the good ole days . . .

He plays golf, cards, he fishes, socializes and travels.

It’s great that he’s been given time, freedom and money, however, he needed health and now he has that too.

My parents have it all and now they even have another income stream that they do not go to work for, they just share with others looking for the same level of health and energy that they enjoy.

Imagine – Health and Money to live on – they all have time at that age!

Young people have lots of health, but no time and no money…

 Baby Boomers have some time some money and some health…

What I propose is to have it all – Be Fit, Be Fabulous and Be Financially Free.

If one or two (or three) areas of this note encourages you to look more in to what I have to offer – please feel free to contact me at askmicheletoday@gmail.com

Think about this:

Do today what others won’t, so you will have a tomorrow that other’s don’t.

Be Healthy & Happy,

Michele Foster

Network-Marketing-167-Billion-Industry

The 50-Plus Job Market: 5 Trends to Watch

Source: retirementrevised.com ~ Author: Mark Miller

Working longer is a mantra these days for many Americans hoping to build greater retirement security. Staying on the job even a few years beyond traditional retirement age makes it easier to delay filing for Social Security; it also can mean more years contributing to retirement accounts and fewer years of depending on nest eggs for living expenses.

But since the Great Recession, staying employed has been easier said than done for all workers. The economy has continued to mend gradually, and the job market has improved. How are older workers faring? The picture is mixed.

More older workers are participating in the labor force, and they experience lower unemployment rates than younger workers. Still, problems remain. Most workers think age discrimination by employers is commonplace. And older workers who do lose their jobs tend to be out of work longer and earn less when they do secure new employment.

If you’re in the ramp-up years to retirement and aspire to stay employed past traditional retirement age, here are five key trends to watch.

Read More…

retirement-quotes-and-sayings-1

The biggest surprises in retirement? The experts weigh in

Source: Rueters.com ~ Author: Mark Miller

The Great Recession served up some nasty financial surprises to people approaching retirement – the housing crash, job loss and shrunken 401(k)s, for starters.

But retirement can bring lifestyle surprises, too. It’s one of life’s biggest transitions, and a major leap into the unknown. Hoping to lessen the guesswork for people who aren’t there yet, I asked experts who work with people transitioning to retirement about the surprises they hear about most often.

“Time freedom” is a shock for many, says Richard Leider, an executive career coach and co-author of “Life Reimagined: Discovering Your New Life Possibilities” (Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2013).

“Without the time structure of working, folks often go on autopilot, the default position of repeating old patterns,” he says. “However, there is no status in the status quo. So, at about the one-year mark, they realize that time is their most precious currency. Often a wake-up call – health, relationships, money or caregiving – forces reflection and helps them to say ‘no’ to the less important things that simply clutter up a life and ‘yes’ to the more important things that define a purposeful life. They choose fulfilling time.”

Read more…

retirement cartoon

 

Flexibility Exercises

Source: nihseniorhealth.gov

To get all of the benefits of physical activity, try all four types of exercise — endurance, strength, balance, and flexibility. This section discusses flexibility exercises.“““

More Freedom of Movement

Stretching, or flexibility, exercises are an important part of your physical activity program. They give you more freedom of movement for your physical activities and for everyday activities such as getting dressed and reaching objects on a shelf. Stretching exercises can improve your flexibility but will not improve your endurance or strength.

Flexibility Exercises to Try

The 12 flexibility exercises which follow are:

  1. neck stretch
  2. shoulder stretch
  3. shoulder and upper arm raise
  4. upper body stretch
  5. chest stretch
  6. back stretch
  7. ankle stretch
  8. back of leg stretch
  9. thigh stretch
  10. hip stretch
  11. lower back stretch
  12. calf stretch

How Much Stretching Should I Do?

Do each stretching exercise 3 to 5 times at each session. Slowly stretch into the desired position, as far as possible without pain, and hold the stretch for 10 to 30 seconds. Relax, breathe, then repeat, trying to stretch farther.

You can progress in your stretching exercises. For example, as you become more flexible, try reaching farther, but not so far that it hurts.

Safety Tips

  • Talk with your doctor if you are unsure about a particular exercise. For example, if you’ve had hip or back surgery, talk with your doctor before doing lower body exercises.
  • Always warm up before stretching exercises and stretch after endurance or strength exercises. If you are doing only stretching exercises, warm up with a few minutes of easy walking first. Stretching your muscles before they are warmed up may result in injury.
  • Always remember to breathe normally while holding a stretch.
  • Stretching may feel slightly uncomfortable; for example, a mild pulling feeling is normal.
  • You are stretching too far if you feel sharp or stabbing pain, or joint pain — while doing the stretch or even the next day. Reduce the stretch so that it doesn’t hurt.
  • Never “bounce” into a stretch. Make slow, steady movements instead. Jerking into position can cause muscles to tighten, possibly causing injury.
  • Avoid “locking” your joints. Straighten your arms and legs when you stretch them, but don’t hold them tightly in a straight position. Your joints should always be slightly bent while stretching.

Neck Stretch

  1. You can do this stretch while standing or sitting in a sturdy chair.
  2. Keep your feet flat on the floor, shoulder-width apart.
  3. Slowly turn your head to the right until you feel a slight stretch. Be careful not to tip or tilt your head forward or backward, but hold it in a comfortable position.
  4. Hold the position for 10 to 30 seconds.
  5. Turn your head to the left and hold the position for 10 to 30 seconds.
  6. Repeat at least 3 to 5 times.

Shoulder Stretch

  1. Stand back against a wall, feet shoulder-width apart and arms at shoulder height.
  2. Bend your elbows so your fingertips point toward the ceiling and touch the wall behind you. Stop when you feel a stretch or slight discomfort, and stop immediately if you feel sharp pain.
  3. Hold position for 10 to 30 seconds.
  4. Let your arms slowly roll forward, remaining bent at the elbows, to point toward the floor and touch the wall again, if possible. Stop when you feel a stretch or slight discomfort.
  5. Hold position for 10 to 30 seconds.
  6. Alternate pointing above head, then toward hips.
  7. Repeat at least 3 to 5 times.

Shoulder and Upper Arm Raise

  1. Stand with feet shoulder-width apart.
  2. Hold one end of a towel in your right hand.
  3. Raise and bend your right arm to drape the towel down your back. Keep your right arm in this position and continue holding on to the towel.
  4. Reach behind your lower back and grasp the towel with your left hand.
  5. To stretch your right shoulder, pull the towel down with your left hand. Stop when you feel a stretch or slight discomfort in your right shoulder.
  6. Repeat at least 3 to 5 times.
  7. Reverse positions, and repeat at least 3 to 5 times.

Upper Body Stretch

  1. Stand facing a wall slightly farther than arm’s length from the wall, feet shoulder-width apart.
  2. Lean your body forward and put your palms flat against the wall at shoulder height and shoulder-width apart.
  3. Keeping your back straight, slowly walk your hands up the wall until your arms are above your head.
  4. Hold your arms overhead for about 10 to 30 seconds.
  5. Slowly walk your hands back down.
  6. Repeat at least 3 to 5 times.

Chest Stretch

  1. You can do this stretch while standing or sitting in a sturdy, armless chair.
  2. Keep your feet flat on the floor, shoulder-width apart.
  3. Hold arms to your sides at shoulder height, with palms facing forward.
  4. Slowly move your arms back, while squeezing your shoulder blades together. Stop when you feel a stretch or slight discomfort.
  5. Hold the position for 10 to 30 seconds.
  6. Repeat at least 3 to 5 times.

Back Stretch

  1. Sit up toward the front of a sturdy chair with armrests. Stay as straight as possible. Keep your feet flat on the floor, shoulder-width apart.
  2. Slowly twist to the left from your waist without moving your hips. Turn your head to the left. Lift your left hand and hold on to the left arm of the chair. Place your right hand on the outside of your left thigh. Twist farther, if possible.
  3. Hold the position for 10 to 30 seconds.
  4. Slowly return to face forward.
  5. Repeat on the right side.
  6. Repeat at least 3 to 5 more times.

Ankle Stretch

  1. Sit securely toward the edge of a sturdy, armless chair.
  2. Stretch your legs out in front of you.
  3. With your heels on the floor, bend your ankles to point toes toward you.
  4. Hold the position for 10 to 30 seconds.
  5. Bend ankles to point toes away from you and hold for 10 to 30 seconds.
  6. Repeat at least 3 to 5 times.

How to Get Down on the Floor

The following stretching exercises are done on the floor. To get down on the floor:

  1. Stand facing the seat of a sturdy chair.
  2. Put your hands on the seat, and lower yourself down on one knee.
  3. Bring the other knee down.
  4. Put your left hand on the floor. Leaning on your hand, slowly bring your left hip to the floor. Put your right hand on the floor next to your left hand to steady yourself, if needed.
  5. You should now be sitting with your weight on your left hip.
  6. Straighten your legs.
  7. Bend your left elbow until your weight is resting on it. Using your right hand as needed for support, straighten your left arm. You should now be lying on your left side.
  8. Roll onto your back.

If you’ve had hip or back surgery, talk with your doctor before using this method.

How to Get Up From the Floor

To get up from the floor:

  1. Roll onto your left side.
  2. Place your right hand on the floor at about the level of your ribs and use it to push your shoulders off the floor. Use your left hand to help lift you up, as needed.
  3. You should now be sitting with your weight on your left hip.
  4. Roll forward, onto your knees, leaning on your hands for support.
  5. Reach up and lean your hands on the seat of a sturdy chair.
  6. Lift one of your knees so that one leg is bent, foot flat on the floor.
  7. Leaning your hands on the seat of the chair for support, rise from this position.

If you’ve had hip or back surgery, talk with your doctor before using this method.

Back of Leg Stretch

  1. Lie on your back with left knee bent and left foot flat on the floor.
  2. Raise right leg, keeping knee slightly bent.
  3. Reach up and grasp right leg with both hands. Keep head and shoulders flat on the floor.
  4. Gently pull right leg toward your body until you feel a stretch in the back of your leg.
  5. Hold position for 10 to 30 seconds.
  6. Repeat at least 3 to 5 times.
  7. Repeat at least 3 to 5 times with left leg.

Thigh Stretch

  1. Lie on your side with legs straight and knees together.
  2. Rest your head on your arm.
  3. Bend top knee and reach back and grab the top of your foot. If you can’t reach your foot, loop a resistance band, belt, or towel over your foot and hold both ends.
  4. Gently pull your leg until you feel a stretch in your thigh.
  5. Hold position for 10 to 30 seconds.
  6. Repeat at least 3 to 5 times.
  7. Repeat at least 3 to 5 times with your other leg.

Hip Stretch

  1. Lie on your back with your legs together, knees bent, and feet flat on the floor. Try to keep both shoulders on the floor throughout the stretch.
  2. Slowly lower one knee as far as you comfortably can. Keep your feet close together and try not to move the other leg.
  3. Hold position for 10 to 30 seconds.
  4. Bring knee back up slowly.
  5. Repeat at least 3 to 5 times.
  6. Repeat at least 3 to 5 times with your other leg.

Lower Back Stretch

  1. Lie on your back with your legs together, knees bent, and feet flat on the floor. Try to keep both arms and shoulders flat on the floor throughout the stretch.
  2. Keeping knees bent and together, slowly lower both legs to one side as far as you comfortably can.
  3. Hold position for 10 to 30 seconds.
  4. Bring legs back up slowly and repeat toward other side.
  5. Continue alternating sides for at least 3 to 5 times on each side.

Calf Stretch

  1. Stand facing a wall slightly farther than arm’s length from the wall, feet shoulder-width apart.
  2. Put your palms flat against the wall at shoulder height and shoulder-width apart.
  3. Step forward with right leg and bend right knee. Keeping both feet flat on the floor, bend left knee slightly until you feel a stretch in your left calf muscle. It shouldn’t feel uncomfortable. If you don’t feel a stretch, bend your right knee until you do.
  4. Hold position for 10 to 30 seconds, and then return to starting position.
  5. Repeat with left leg.
  6. Continue alternating legs for at least 3 to 5 times on each leg.

 

Newsletter 10/30/2014

 

Hello,

I just spent the last week with my 84 year old mother and 88 year old Dad. Wow! I am fortunate to still have them both alive and living a great quality of life. Even with our good fortune there are things that really struck home with me that I really need to share.

Car givers – they are necessary and invaluable and you cannot afford NOT to have them.

Point number 1, when facing retirement you need good insurance and Money-lots of it!

Advocacy – there are so many Seniors that health care is not hurting. At any appointment I went on with my parents, they were just another elderly couple waiting in a very big line or lobby because so many seniors live at the Doctors office.

Point  number 2, You need preventive care and it starts with Nutrition, and everyone needs an advocate, not someone that works at the office or hospital, someone that represents you the patient –  a loved one , friend, or salaried caregiver.

When I started thinking and planning for my own retirement, now at age 58, I realized that I must include in my plans, care of my parents too. And, my parents have a pension as well as long term care insurance  – unlike the majority of Americans who do not.

It is important to stay well and the best way to do that is; proper nutrition and less stress . . . which means less financial issues. You cannot be truly well if you are consistently worried about money – at any age!

Make a plan and work the plan – small daily consistencies can deliver long term lasting results. And you if don’t have a plan for you and your family, I have a plan that I want to share with you.

Until recently I did not know there was a solution available to create residual income for retirement and beyond. Now that I know, I want to share this with the world… or at least with people that are looking for real financial freedom.

My sincere hope is that, while you are reading through the facts and figures in this newsletter, you will consider reaching out to me and let me share with you a plan that will facilitate healthy aging and financial freedom . . .

Enjoy Life!

Michele Foster

Retired

Will you outlive your retirement savings?

An article appeared on Bloomberg last week that sounded the alarm on the very real prospect that millions of people will outlive their retirement savings. Lawmakers Seek to Prevent Americans Outliving Savings (Bloomberg, June 11, 2010) had this to say:

“In 1983, 62 percent of workers had only company-funded pensions, while 12 percent had 401(k)s, the center said. In 2007, those numbers were 17 percent and 63 percent, respectively”¦ Most American households at or near retirement “are consumed by fear,” said Anthony Webb, associate director of research at the research nonprofit. “Instead of walking on the beach hand-in-hand in retirement, the reality is that they’re sitting around the kitchen table cutting coupons”¦Nearly half, or 47 percent, of those on the verge of retirement are predicted to run out of money”¦”

The article went on to say that the average 401(k) account has $66,900, and the average monthly Social Security benefit is $1,067—both numbers as of the spring of this year, and neither consistent with the TV version of retirement.

Those numbers are averages and we can and should plan to be above average. But even if we are, even if we’re successful in achieving the hallowed million dollar 401k, will it be enough to cover us for decades of retirement living and the inflation, recessions and stock market reversals that will be inevitable over such a time span?

READ ON… What should we be doing now

Calculator: Will you have enough to retire?

Visit http://money.cnn.com/calculator/retirement/retirement-need/ for the calclator.

Sources: Social Security Administration; Federal Reserve of Philadelphia; Department of Labor.

Methodology

This calculator estimates how much you’ll need to save for retirement. To make sure you’re thinking about the long haul, we assume you’ll live to age 92. But you could live to be 100 or incur large medical bills early on in retirement that may raise your costs even further. Social Security is factored into these calculations, but other sources of income, such as pensions and annuities, are not. All calculations are pre-tax.

The results offer a general idea of how much you’ll need and are not intended to be investment advice. The results are presented in both future dollars (at retirement) and today’s dollars, which is calculated using an inflation rate of 2.3%.

Read more…

The 10 Best Places to Retire on Social Security Alone

In these places, Social Security is likely to cover your basic monthly costs.

 

The Best Places to Retire on $75 a Day

You can live well on a small amount of savings in these affordable cities.

 

Best Places to Retire for Under $40,000

In these cities, you can live well for less than $40,000 per year.

 

10 Low-impact Exercises for Seniors


indoor swimming pools
Exercise is important for good health at any age, and seniors are no exception. You’ll want to talk to a doctor before you start any new exercise regimen, but once you get the all-clear, a low-impact exercise routine can benefit your health by stretching and strengthening your muscles, reducing stress, preventing injury and even helping to lower your blood pressure.

Many gyms offer excellent low-impact exercise classes for seniors, but staying fit doesn’t require a gym. Whether you prefer to get your workout from an instructor in a class, on a gym machine or outdoors, you can reap exercise’s health benefits and have a little bit of fun at the same time.

Low-impact exercises fall into four categories: endurance, strength, flexibility and balance. Incorporating all four types of exercise into your routine helps reduce the risk of injury and keeps you from getting bored. Instead of doing just one exercise all the time, mix it up! For a well-rounded exercise routine, try combining endurance exercises, like walking or swimming, with exercises that focus on the other categories. You can build strength through light weight training or yoga, for example. Yoga is also a great way to improve flexibility and balance.

Looking for more low-impact exercises to round out your workout? We’ve got a list to get you started!

 

Newsletter 10/18/2014

Hello,

This newsletter is all about FACTS:

Rather than bullet pointing all this knowledge, I will recommend to you  small investment to looking at your financial future.

The Next Millionaires by Paul Zane Pilzner costs just $.70 cents on Amazon.

If you want to align your efforts with increasing trends. If you want Experts to point you in the right direction. If you want not only Financial Freedom And the Energy to enjoy it. Take a listen to Paul ‘s CD.

To Your Wellness – Financially & Physically,

Michele

 

work from home cartoon2The Next Millionaires—Wellness Entrepreneurs

If you are an entrepreneur, or considering becoming one in wellness, there has never been a better time in history to own your own business.

When I was growing up in the 1950s, millionaires were fictional characters on television shows like The Millionaire or in comic strips like Little Orphan Annie. Nobody actually knew or saw a millionaire. Even on the The Millionairethe “millionaire” John Beresford Tipton never appeared on camera. I remember asking my dad to go out to dinner and hearing his reply: “What do you think we are, millionaires?”

Read More…

“If you don’t take care of yourself, the undertaker will overtake that responsibility for you.” – Carrie Latet

7 Ways to Sneak Exercise Into the Self-Employed Lifestyle

When you’re self-employed, it’s easy to think that your schedule is 100% your own, and that you can pick and choose exactly how you want to spend your time. However, entrepreneurs work hard to please clients and build the perfect business — which means that personal time is often sacrificed for last minute projects, client meetings and tight deadlines.

The stress and long hours of the entrepreneurial lifestyle often come at the expense of physical and mental well-being. Trips to the gym take a back seat to the business.

If you’ve been struggling to find a way to fit regular exercise into your unpredictable, self-employed schedule, here are a few tips for the new year.

Read more…

paul zane pilzer“The early pioneers of both wellness and network marketing were motivated by the sense that it was possible to create a better life than the conventional routes offered – better personal health and better economic health, respectively. Now the ‘alternatives’ of yesterday have become the economic powerhouses of today and tomorrow.” ~Paul Zane Pilzer

9 Tips to Eat Healthy When You Work From Home

Helpful strategies to keep nibbling to a minimum when you work only steps from a well-stocked home kitchen.

We’ve all had those days. The refrigerator seems like it’s calling out your name. No one will know if you have just one piece of pepperoni pizza or a few bites of a sprinkle-topped lemon cupcake. But you will probably regret it when you can’t zip your “comfy” jeans or a button on a favorite blouse pops at an inopportune time.

As the summer holiday season approaches, the temptation to indulge can get stronger as our houses are filled with home-baked goodies. Here are a few tips that should help you keep things under control, stay healthy and look your summer best.

Read more…

30-Minute Workout, No Gym Required

From Health magazine

Who has time to burn megacalories? You do! Perform these exercises just three times a week to drop winter weight.

Feel the burn

Who has time to burn megacalories? You do! This speedy workout from Equinox instructor Lashaun Dale, based on her popular Cardio Bootcamp & Sculpt class, will blast up to 350 calories in just under 30 minutes, and you’ll build strength while you’re at it. Do this routine just three times a week to drop winter weight. (Planning a beach vacation? Add a brisk 45-minute walk on alternate days to burn another 250 calories a day. You’ll toast more than 2,000 calories a week!)

jacks-400x400Jumping jacks

Do jumping jacks for 2 minutes.

 

 

side-lunge-400x400

Side lunge

Stand holding 5- to 8-pound dumbbells. Step right leg out to side and bend knee to 90 degrees, reaching hands down on either side of right foot. Push off right foot to return to standing with right foot directly in front of left foot, arms sweeping up with palms facing in. Repeat on left side with left foot stepping behind right as you return to center; that’s 1 rep. Do 24 reps,then switch lead legs and repeat.

 

dancing-squat-400x400

Dancing squat

Stand with right foot forward, a 5- to 8-pound weight in left hand. Squat; touch weight to floor as right hand lifts. Stand, lift left knee, touch right hand to right left in front of you. Squat then stand; touch right hand to left foot behind you; that’s 1 rep. Do 24 reps; switch sides and repeat.

 

 

line-hops-400x400

Line hops

Step or hop sideways over a stretched-out jump rope for 2 minutes.

 

 

tipsy-bridge-400x400

Tipsy bridge and lift

Lie on your back, feet hip-width apart, flexed left foot on a yoga block or telephone book, right foot on the floor. Keeping shoulders and head neutral and abs tight, lift hips so your body forms a straight line from shoulders to knees. Lower down, then lift right foot, bringing knee in toward chest. Return foot to floor; that’s 1 rep. Do 24 reps, then switch sides and repeat.

 

biceps-400x400Biceps and arm circles

Stand with legs slightly wider than hip-width, a 5- to 8-pound dumbbell in each hand, elbows bent and palms up. Keeping spine straight, squat and circle left hand up and in toward your shoulder in a circular motion (as if beckoning someone toward you); reverse to lower hand. Do 16 reps, then switch sides and repeat.

 

 

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Fast feet

Step quickly forward and backward over a stretched-out jump rope for 2 minutes.

 

 

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Triceps with a twist

Lie on back with knees bent, a 5- to 8-pound dumbbell in right hand lifted so weight is over shoulder. Let knees fall left while bending right elbow until end of weight touches floor near ear. Straighten right arm while lifting hips, legs, head, and shoulders. Lower gently down. Do 24 reps, then switch sides and repeat.

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Roll over and sit up

Start lying on stomach, chest lifted, arms stretched overhead, legs straight. Roll to right onto your back, bending knees slightly and bringing arms halfway down; curl up to sitting position as arms move back overhead. Curl back down, and roll back over onto stomach. Do 16 reps, then switch directions and repeat.

 

 

cross-crawl-400x400Cross crawl

Raise your arms, then lift left knee and bring right elbow down to meet it. Repeat on opposite side; alternate for 2 minutes, moving as quickly as possible.

 

 

You’re done!