The 7-Minute Workout That Science Says Actually Works

By now you’ve probably heard about the Scientific 7-Minute Workout that blew up a few years ago. If not, allow us to fill you in.

A recent study laid out exactly how to work out to get the maximum results in the minimum amount of time with just your body weight, a chair, and a wall. The trick is to strategically order the exercises so you’re working different major muscle groups (upper body, lower body, core) each time. This allows for one major muscle group to rest while you work for the next muscle group, resulting in a super-efficient, super-effective routine. The workout takes just seven minutes, can be done in the comfort of your own home, and can improve your health and decrease body fat—according to science.

 

Although this is a great way to work out fast, the routine isn’t a miracle worker. High-intensity interval training is not designed to be done every day, so be sure to allow for at least one rest day between workouts. Exercising for seven minutes a few times a week is not going to totally transform your body, but when done correctly, it’s better than zero minutes (duh!), and you’ll likely see some health benefits—for example, being able to run up the stairs without getting winded. As always, check with your doctor before beginning any high-intensity exercise routine.

How to use this list: Perform each exercise below at a high-intensity effort for 30 seconds. For static exercises such as Wall Sit and Plank, hold the position for 30 seconds. For exercises that target two sides (such as your legs), alternate each side for 30 seconds. Rest for 10 seconds between each exercise. This circuit can be repeated 2-3 times if desired.

1. Jumping Jack

It’s a gym classic—but you’ve gotta move fast! Stand with feet hip-width apart. Jump feet open as you raise arms up to form an X. Jump feet back together as you lower arms to sides.

2. Wall Sit

Stand with back to the wall. Walk feet away from the wall as you slide back down the wall, lowering the body until hips, knees, and ankles are at 90-degree angles. Engage core to keep low back pressed against the wall.
Start in high plank, wrists under shoulders, core engaged. Lower chest to floor, keeping legs, hips, and back in a straight line. Press into palms to lift back up. For more details on how to do a push-up, click here.

4. Crunch

Lie faceup on the floor with knees bent and arms reaching straight out. Press low back into the floor and engage the core to lift shoulder blades up off the floor and slightly forward.

5. Step-Up

Stand facing chair (or stool) and lift right foot onto the seat. Press into the heel of right foot to lift your body weight onto the chair, balancing on right leg. Slowly lower back down to the floor. Switch legs and repeat. Continue to alternate.
Stand with feet just wider than hip-width, hips stacked over knees, knees over ankles. Hinge at hips then send hips back and bend knees to lower body. Keep chest lifted and lower to at least 90 degrees. Rise and repeat. For more details on how to squat, click here.

7. Triceps Dip

Sit on edge of the chair and place hands on edge just outside of hips. Walk feet out a few steps, slide butt off chair, and straighten arms. Bend elbows and lower body until arms are bent at about 90 degrees. Press down into the chair to return to the starting position.

Place hands directly under shoulders. Engage core and squeeze glutes to stabilize the body. Keep neck and spine neutral. The Head should be in line with the back. Hold position. For more details on how to plank like a pro, click here.

9. High Knees

Stand tall with feet hip-width. Engage core and use lower abs to lift and lower one knee at a time as if running in place. Bring
knees to the same height as hips, thighs parallel to the floor, and try not to lean back. Stay on balls of feet and alternate legs as fast as possible.

Stand tall. Take a big step forward with the right leg and lower body until right thigh is parallel to the floor and right shin is vertical (don’t let knee go past right toe). Press into right heel to drive back up to starting position. Repeat on other side. Continue to alternate legs. For more details, click here.

11. Push-Up With Rotation

Start in high plank and lower body then press back up to perform a push-up. From high plank, shift weight to left arm and rotate the body to the left side. Hold side plank for one count keeping hips high. Return to starting position, perform a push-up, and repeat on the right side. Continue to alternate.

12. Side Plank

Lie on one side with legs and feet stacked on top of one another. Lift hips to prop the body up on an elbow, keeping feet stacked. Press forearm into the ground to keep torso and hips in a straight line. Hold.
Another Source:  another link to follow https://workoutcave.com/7-minute-workout/

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Like so many women all over the world, I spent a great portion of my life feeling lonely.

One day I decided that I had been feeling sorry for myself long enough. I made a decision to get my life on track and spend the rest of my days empowering women and men to victory in their lives through their physical and financial health.

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How Nightly Routines and Relaxation Techniques Can Improve the Quality of Your Child’s Sleep

Unlike adults, children don’t always appreciate the benefits of a good night’s sleep. While parents look forward to slipping under the covers at the end of a long day, kids find plenty of creative excuses to delay bedtime. Unfortunately, bedtime delays can decrease the quality and duration of your child’s sleep and affect his or her behavior and performance at school. Following a few of these suggestions can help you ensure that your child gets enough rest at night.

Pay Attention to Sleep Recommendations

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the following daily sleep totals for kids:

  • 4 to 12 Months. 12 to 16 hours
  • 1 to 2 Years. 11 to 14 hours
  • 3 to 5 Years. 10 to 13 hours
  • 6 to 12 Years. Nine to 12 hours
  • 13 to 18 Years. Eight to 10 hours

Even slight sleep deficits can affect your child’s grades. A Savvy Sleeper survey revealed that high schoolers who got 8.1 hours of sleep received mostly As, while their peers who only slept for 7.3 hours got Cs.

Control the Environment

Sleep environment plays a crucial role in sleep quality. Your child may have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep if he or she doesn’t have a dark, quiet place to sleep. The National Sleep Foundation reports that the 60 to 67 degrees Fahrenheit is the optimum temperature for quality sleep.

It can be difficult to sleep if your blanket is scratchy or your bed is too small. Kids can outgrow cribs or toddler beds quickly. Make sure your child’s bed is at least a foot longer than his or her height. Soft bedding and a supportive pillow (if your child is 2 or older) will help keep your child comfortable during the night.

Ban Digital Devices and TV Before Bed

Blue light from smartphones, laptops, tablets, and TVs can interfere with your child’s ability to fall asleep and stay asleep. Ask your kids to turn off devices at least an hour before bed to prevent sleep quality problems.

Set a Bedtime

Kids are more likely to get the recommended amount of sleep when parents set and enforce bedtimes, according to a Canadian study. In fact, both kids and parents benefit when they go to bed and wake up at the same time every day. Ideally, sleep and wake up times should be approximately the same whether it’s a weekend or weekday.

Limit Caffeine

Chances are you would have trouble falling and staying asleep if you downed a big cup of coffee in the evening. Kids may have just as much difficulty if they drink caffeinated drinks in the hours before bedtime. Water or milk are better, healthier options.

Embrace Routine

Routines help your child wind down at the end of the day and set the stage for sleep. For younger children, the bedtime routine may include a bath and story, while older kids may enjoy board games, free play or reading a favorite book 30 to 60 minutes before turning the lights out. Starting routines early may even help prevent bedtime struggles as your child grows older.

Help Your Kids Relax

Stress doesn’t only affect adults. Worries about grades, friends or the monster under the bed can trigger stress and anxiety that make it hard for children and adolescents to fall asleep. Teaching your child meditation, calming yoga poses or progressive relaxation techniques can help them learn to relax at bedtime. Progressive relaxation involves tensing then relaxing muscle groups, starting with the lower part of the body first.

Does your child have sleep issues? We’ll find the source of the problem and offer suggestions and treatments designed to improve sleep quality. Contact us to schedule an appointment.

Sources:

National Sleep Foundation: Find Out What the Ideal Thermostat Setting Is to Help You Snooze Longer

https://www.sleep.org/articles/temperature-for-sleep/

BMC Public Health: Do Parents’ Support Behaviors Predict Whether or Not Their Children Get Sufficient Sleep? A Cross-Sectional Study

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5442855/

National Sleep Foundation: Children and Sleep

https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/children-and-sleep

Healthy Children: Healthy Sleep Habits

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/sleep/Pages/Healthy-Sleep-Habits-HTo YOurow-Many-Hours-Does-Your-Child-Need.aspx

Savvy Sleeper: Costing Kids Sleep, 7/7/19

https://www.savvysleeper.org/costing-kids-sleep/

Self-Care for Health and Stress Management

Do you struggle with so many responsibilities in life that you forget to take care of yourself? You might be dealing with the care of your children, perhaps you are a caregiver for a family member, or maybe you are giving  150% of your energy to a business you are trying to launch.

And, while it is hard to prioritize something like getting in just 30 minutes of exercise when you have so many other things on your to-do list, remember that self-care is an important aspect of stress management.

How Self-Care Benefits You:

However, if you want to feel more resilient and better able to manage life’s stresses, you need to take time for self-care.  A walk around the park, a long soak in the tub or other forms of pampering renew you inside and out. Taking time out to maintain self-care has several benefits:

It Makes You a Better Caregiver

When people ignore their own self-care, and forget to tend to their own needs,  they risk deeper levels of self pity, low self-esteem, and feelings of anger and bitterness.

Sometimes people who spend most of their time taking care of others can be at risk for burn out, which in turn, makes it very difficult to care for others, much less themselves.

In reality, when you care for yourself regularly,  you make you a better caregiver for others.

It Affects Your Health & Wellness

While self-care doesn’t always lead to any health and wellness enhancements, the way healthy a diet and exercise do, the relaxation you get from self-care can trigger a decompression response… which can prevent persistent stress from damaging your health.

It Affects Your Emotional Well-being

If you feel like stress is taking over your life, think how you can better handle its effects and find relief in simpler routines.

Taking time out to care for yourself can remind you, and others, that you also have needs that are important too.

And, when you take care of  yourself — you feel better about yourself and your life. This sends a message to family and friends around you – that you value yourself. It also contributes to your long-term feelings of well-being.

The Importance of Self-Care

It goes without saying that if you are getting enough sleep, eating healthy meals, including down-time in your schedule and making time for friends, you already understand the importance of self-care.

However, a few hours of self-indulgence on a regular basis is also a good idea. A couple of hours of  ‘me-time’ for a spa treatment might be just the ticket to help manage the stress, and here’s why:

It Calms Chaotic Feelings

Giving your body special treatment is an inherent way to alleviate stress. Besides keeping your skin soft and your body well maintained, spa-like activities, like massage, and warm baths have been known to comfort even cranky babies like nothing else.

Similar activities continue to be effective means to an end, providing the necessary diversions we need as we get older, however, sometimes we forget to make use of them.

It Gives You a Break from Stress

Spending some time in a bubble bath, or taking the time for a full body massage can help you relax and escape the day to day stressful reality, providing a  mental and emotional break.

As previously mentioned, it triggers the relaxation response and allows you to come back to the reality of your life feeling refreshed and relaxed.

It Gives You Time Alone

Whether you are an extrovert, or an introvert, having some time along is important to most people in order to function at your most efficient.

When you give yourself some down time, it’s much easier to slip into a state of quiet introspection and soul searching, giving your mind the chance to work on problems without taking all of your attention.

The No. 1 Way to Keep Metabolism Soaring Post-Workout

You know that your metabolism gets a big boost during exercise. That’s why you burn more calories by running than by sitting. But there are ways to trick your metabolism into running strong all day long, even hours after you exercise.

Metabolism consists of hormones and enzymes converting food into fuel; this fuel provides the energy the body needs to do daily tasks like thinking, all the way through to more active tasks like biking or yoga. When your metabolism is working at its peak—such as when you’re running at your race pace on a treadmill—you are creating and using energy more efficiently. As your body plows through those calories, you’ll lose weight faster and streamline your journey to a fitter physique.

So how do you keep your metabolism cranking after you’ve untied your shoes, showered, and settled in at your desk? It’s all about those first moments after your workout, says Paul Arciero, Ed.D., a professor of exercise and nutrition at Skidmore College and director of the school’s Human Nutrition and Metabolism Lab.

“The best trick to keep your metabolism high after you work out is eating 20 to 30 grams of protein, preferably whey,” he says.

Protein takes more energy for your body to digest and absorb than other types of food; you may burn 25 percent of the protein calories you consume just by eating. After eating protein your body will stay in overdrive, which means you’ll process more calories more quickly in the minutes and hours to come. Also, protein helps your body build more muscle, and the more lean body mass you have, the higher your metabolism burns. Whey protein is one of the most easily absorbed types of protein, which is why Arciero is such an advocate of the stuff.

Of course, what you do during your workout can also affect how well your body burns calories later in the day. Arciero suggests sprint workouts to really maximize your post-workout metabolic boost. Intervals—such as alternating one minute all-out and one minute of recovery—send your metabolism soaring as you exercise and keep it running strong for hours after too. Follow an interval fitness session with a protein-rich snack, such as a whey protein smoothie, for the ultimate metabolism jumpstart.

Source: shape.com ~ By: Liz Simmons ~ Image: pixabay.com