How To Get Inbound Links: 7 Strategies That Actually Work

Is your website suffering from link deficiency?

You’ve probably heard how important backlinks are for SEO (roughly 40% of Google’s ranking factors). But getting inbound links ain’t easy. Rather than going out and building links on external websites, Google’s Matt Cutts says we should earn links through creative content.

And since part of creating “good” content is making your pages/posts stand out, I only found it appropriate to use a set of brilliant colored pencils to light this page up with some personality. I actually borrowed this idea from an article on Search Engine Journal (only they cheated and used a cute puppy). Either way, making your content visual, useful, and easy to navigate is WHY people will link to it. People don’t link to anything – you need to do something different.

1. Create Educational Content

This is the type of content people actually WANT to link to, they’re not just going to come by themselves. I specialize in SEO for WordPress so most people are looking for help configuring the Yoast SEO Plugin, or how to make a WordPress site load faster. These are some main topics people want to learn and I have spent WEEKS writing these tutorials. They’re the ones I put front and center in my navigation menu and the ones I link to most on my site. If you have a high value keyword but only a mediocre post about it, you should try improving that content.

What happens when you take a mediocre post and invest multiple days turning it into the best tutorial online? My Yoast tutorial went from 5 visits/day to 100 visits/day (all from SEO) within 24 hours of republishing it with the new content. Now it has over 190 comments and a TON of links from people who have found it through Google. Of course it’s been ranking on the first page for it’s keyword (Yoast SEO Settings) for years because I’ve invested hours and hours into the content. When Matt Cutts says to “create good content” that’s exactly what he means.

WordPress Speed Optimization Guide

You need to identify key topics and write the ‘ultimate guide’ on each one. Yes it can take an entire week to write just one article, but that’s exactly what it takes if you want an extra 100 visits/day through a single post. Good content WILL pay off especially since Google has started penalizing websites with low quality content. 90% of my links are to my SEO tutorials.

Creating articles targeting high value keywords (educational topics) helps you:

  • Establish long-term, high traffic posts
  • Get links through SEO traffic it generates
  • Be viewed as an authority in your industry
  • Get tons of comments/conversations on those posts
  • Acquire some of the most loyal followers through education

2. Spruce Up Your Content

Visual content is 40x more likely to get shared (source) and while nice graphics are obviously important, don’t limit your content to text and graphics. Embed a Twitter status if you’re quoting someone, use a 2 column layout to list pros and cons, embed a video, or use an HTML table of contents like you see in the top of this post to help people navigate to specific topics.

I personally like using 2 column layouts in many of my blog posts. I also know my content body is 680 pixels (width) which means if I’m using a 2 column layout with photos, each photo would be 330(w) if you count the 20 pixels of space between each column. Knowing your dimensionshelps you resize images to look better and makes them load faster. Just a quick tip for you 🙂

680 Pixel Width Rectangle

Although it’s specific to WordPress, my tutorial on how to spruce up content in WordPress has a LOT of ideas for diversifying your content. This includes how to add an HTML table of contents, embed a Youtube video without Youtube’s branding, embed social media statuses, style fonts, and other ideas. Here are just a few ways you can make your content more visual…

Content Ideas

  • Add an HTML table of content to help with navigation
  • Design infographics using canva.com or hire a freelancer
  • Embedded videos, ideally your own if it’s a high value topic
  • Take screenshots (I do a LOT of this since I blog about WordPress)
  • Use Advanced Twitter Search to find tweets to embed on your posts
  • Style links (and their hover color) in your posts so they’re easy to see
  • Use tables, 2 column layouts, buttons, lists, bold items, and other styling options
  • Adding a photo/bio in your blog sidebar so people know who is writing the article

3. Add Videos

People love videos (and love linking to them too), but few website owners actually do this. Creating your own videos if definitely preferred if you have the time, but even finding a helpful video on Youtube adds a ton of value to your content, like what Matt Cutts says about links…

Listen, I’m an introverted dude who was completely uncomfortable creating SEO tutorials (I still cringe when I hear myself talk). But guess what? I have over 200,000 views between all my Youtube videos and have gotten links, clients, and affiliate sales through these videos. When I write a super important article on my site (like my tutorial on optimizing content for keywords) I will create a video and embed it on that tutorial. Videos not only attract links because people love them, but by embedding videos on your site you are also improving engagement with your content (average time on page) which Google uses to determine your rankings.

Higher rankings, more links, more subscribers, and more sales from people who saw your videos. That’s like a win-win-win-win! Suck it up, get a camera, and start creating some videos.

4. Design Infographics (In 10 Minutes)

What else do people like linking to? Infographics. Read this article by HubSpot which says visual content is 40x more likely to get shared. You can create these yourself using a free infographic maker like canva.com or hire a freelance infographic designer for around $100-$400 depending on the graphics, how detailed your directions are, and the freelancer’s rate.

This infographic literally took me 10 minutes to create…

seo-link-building-infographic

I’m still trying to keep up with my videos, but you should be investing time in either videos or infographics – ideally both if you have the time/money. I urge you to create a couple videos or infographics and see what happens. I bet traffic to your post will double, and so will your links.

5. Post Long Content

One of the BIGGEST mistakes I see is people throwing up short content (usually mostly text) and wondering why it doesn’t rank. If you want to be on the first page of Google and people to link to you, your content needs to be better (and more thorough) than everyone else behind you. Longer content ranks higher in search engines and posts with 3000+ words is ideal. If you’re using WordPress, the Yoast SEO Plugin counts number of words for you in the content analysis tab, otherwise you can paste your full article in a Google Doc and do a word count.

When I revisit old posts to improve the content, I try add at least 500 words. You can plan out key topics (subheadings), add a table of contents in the beginning with those subheadings, then add additional sections to the article. Do your research and Google the keyword, see what other people are writing about, then include topics you think would make your article better.

6. Improve Your Design

People link to websites that look good. This does NOT have to cost a lot of money. For $40/hour you can hire a skilled overseas developer on freelancer.com who can help you design or redesign your site. I’ve been working with the same WordPress developer (Pronaya) for 5 years who is only $40/hour and helped me build over 25 websites when I was running a small WordPress design business. You can hire him by signing up for a freelancer account and searching for user BDkamol. I’ve invested $20,000 in him over 5 years because he’s that good.

pronaya-freelancer

Even if it means migrating your to a WordPress theme from StudioPress (super nice mobile responsive themes), I did this and it this has payed off HUGE for me. My old site wasn’t responsive so I migrated to StudioPress and while I can’t directly correlate it with link growth, it looks WAY better, loads in under 1 second, and is more SEO-friendly. Generally the nicer your website is (and the easier it is for people to find things) to more people will link to you.

7. Do More Content Marketing

Once you’ve creating an AMAZING piece of content around a high value keyword and published it, you need to get some eyeballs on it. Here are a few easy ways you can do that…

  • Send out a newsletter
  • Post it on your social networks
  • Join Facebook groups and share it when appropriate
  • Email bloggers in your industry who it would interest
  • Mention people in the actual article (they could likely link to it)
  • Publish interviews and quotes from Twitter to include more people
  • Hold contests, prizes, and discounts in return for sharing your content
  • Create a Youtube video about the topic and leave a link in the description

Avoid Hiring A “Link Builder”

You can hire an overseas link building freelancer on websites like freelancer.com and upwork.com but I would NOT do it since this can get you a Google penalty. I dabbled with some (very high rated) link building freelancers and they did get me ranked higher for WordPress SEO consulting and other services. But sure enough, within a couple months I got hit with a Google penalty and my traffic cut in half. It took me several months (and a lot of hard work) to recover from this penalty so do yourself a favor and avoid doing this together.

Besides, Matt Cutts says we should be earning links, not building them.

matt-cutts-link-building

The few “link building” methods that actually work:

That’s all I got! If you have any questions about how to get inbound links to your website, drop me a line in the comments (glad to help). Just remember, people naturally want to link to good content so that is the single most important thing you can do to speed up your link growth.

Source: onlinemediamasters.com ~ By:  TOM DUPUIS ~ Image: pixabay.com

The Difference Between Direct and Organic Search Traffic Sources

For a long time, digital marketers summed up the properties of direct and organic traffic pretty similarly and simply. To most, organic traffic consists of visits from search engines, while direct traffic is made up of visits from people entering your company URL into their browser. This explanation, however, is too simplified and leaves most digital marketers short-handed when it comes to completely understanding and gaining insights from web traffic, especially organic and direct sources.

Beyond organic and direct traffic, you must understand the difference between all of your traffic sources and how traffic is classified. Most web analytics platforms, like Google Analytics, utilize an algorithm and flow chart based on the referring website or parameters set within the URL that determine the source of traffic. Here is a breakdown of all sources:

  • Referral: Traffic that occurs when a user finds you through a site other than a major search engine
  • Social: Traffic from a social network, such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, or Instagram
  • Organic: Traffic from search engine results that is earned, not paid
  • Paid search: Traffic from search engine results that is the result of paid advertising via Google AdWords or another paid search platform
  • Email: Traffic from email marketing that has been properly tagged with an email parameter
  • Other: If traffic does not fit into another source or has been tagged as “Other” via a URL parameter, it will be bucketed into “Other” traffic.
  • Direct: Any traffic where the referrer or source is unknown.

Now that we have a general basis for all traffic sources, let’s dig into the specifics of two very important sources: direct and organic traffic.

Direct Traffic

Direct traffic is defined as visits with no referring website. When a visitor follows a link from one website to another, the site of origin is considered the referrer. These sites can be search engines, social media, blogs, or other websites that have links to other websites. Direct traffic categorizes visits that do not come from a referring URL.

Traditionally, we’ve attributed these visitors to manually entering the URL of the website or click on a bookmarked link. Today, however, the story behind direct traffic is a bit more complex, and the number of visits from direct traffic seems to be growing for many websites, especially sites with growing organic traffic.

To test this theory, back in 2014, Groupon ran a test in which it de-indexed its site for six hours. When Groupon did this, it was able to conclude that 60 percent of direct traffic was actually organic because de-indexing its site and halting organic traffic also dropped its direct traffic.

Why are more sites seeing direct traffic growth, and what should you do about it?

Let’s dig into the common causes of direct source traffic to find the answer:

  • Internal employees: Your employees commonly visit your site and do not have their IP filtered from web analytics. As a rule of thumb, filter out all company IPs from web analytics.
  • Customers: Do your customers log into a customer portal on your site? This is often a culprit within direct traffic. In this case, you do not want to completely filter out the traffic, but instead set up different views within Google Analytics to view web analytics without this traffic.
  • Actual direct traffic: These are the people who enter your URL into their browser or find you via a bookmark. There’s nothing you can do to dig deeper on this—just embrace the fact that users actually know your brand.
  • Emails from particular email clients: It’s quite common for email clicks from Outlook or Thunderbird to not pass on referring information. You can typically identify whether an email caused a spike in direct traffic by analyzing traffic around the time a particular email was sent.
  • Mobile traffic: In the Groupon experiment mentioned above, Groupon found that both browser and device matter in web analytics’ ability to track organic traffic. Although desktops using common browsers saw a smaller impact from the test (10-20 percent), mobile devices saw a 50 percent drop in direct traffic when the site was de-indexed. In short, as mobile users grow, we are likely to see direct traffic rise even more from organic search traffic.
  • Clicks on mobile apps or desktop softwares: Programs such as Skype or news apps often do not pass referring information and result in direct traffic. The best way to capture and analyze this further is to understand where your site links might be commonly used or placed digitally, including apps.
  • Secure (https) to non-secure sites (http): Since Google began emphasizing the importance of having a secure site, more websites are securely hosted, as indicated by the “https” in their URLs. Per the security protocol, however, any traffic going from a secure site to a non-secure site will not pass referral information. For this issue, you can correct by updating your site to be secure through a third-party SSL certificate.

When you look at your overall traffic, a healthy amount of direct traffic is about 20 percent, according to web analytics pro Avinash Kaushik. However, with major web shifts that are disabling marketers from tracking the true source of traffic, it is likely we will see this percentage rise. Now, what about organic traffic?

Organic Traffic

Organic traffic is the primary channel that inbound marketing strives to increase. This traffic is defined as visitors coming from a search engine, such as Google or Bing. This does not include paid search ads, but that doesn’t mean that organic traffic isn’t impacted by paid search or display advertising, either positively or negatively. In general, people trust search engines, and sayings such as “just Google it” reinforce that humans are tied to the search engine. Thus, paid search, display, or even offline campaigns can drive searches, which may increase organic traffic while those campaigns are running.

That said, we also know that organic search traffic as a whole has been negatively impacted by the layout changes Google made to search results last year, which caused some websites such as Wayfair to see 25 percent of click share on desktop and 55 percent on mobile be lost to paid search results.

To sum up all of this information, even organic traffic, like direct traffic, has some gray areas. For the most part, though, organic traffic is driven by SEO. The better you are ranking for competitive keywords, the more organic traffic will result. Websites that consistently create content optimized for search will see a steady increase in organic search traffic and improved positioning in the search results. As a marketer, it is important to look at your keywords and high-ranking pages to identify new SEO opportunities each month.

Traffic data is a great way to take the temperature of your website and marketing initiatives. When you are writing and promoting blog content on a regular basis, you can use traffic data to track results and correlate these efforts to actual ROI. Be sure to look at traffic numbers over long-term intervals to see trends and report on improvement over time.

Source: smartbugmedia.com ~ By: Amber Kemmis ~ Image: pixabay.com

How SEO Works, Exactly

Search engine optimization evolves and changes all the time.

Every year, certain methods are embraced by the SEO community as “must-have tactics,” while others get pushed to the brink of history thanks to Google’s algorithm updates.

In light of this, SEO is perceived by many as a never-ending battle between search engines and SEO professionals who continue to puzzle out updates to gain more traffic and increase SERP visibility for a short while.

But is that really the case? How exactly does SEO work?

In this article, I will provide my perspective on the SEO landscape today, list several fundamental principles that search engines adhere to, and share my understanding about the inner workings of SEO, and why combining multiple tactics through trial and error is the only way to successfully drive your campaign.

Today’s SEO Landscape

Before I get down to the nitty-gritty, let’s get a broader perspective of what is going on in SEO right now.

If we search for  [income lawyer new york] on Google, here is what we see first:

Search results with ads

And then this:

Featured snippet news

And this:

QA snippet in Google search

We only see actual search results halfway down the first page. Then, even more ads and more related search terms.

What it comes down is this: Google and other search engines suppress organic results from search.

Although Google still displays 10 organic results per page, they are designed to draw attention to ads, answer boxes, “People also ask” sections and other widgets.

It is hardly surprising that organic CTR has dropped by 37 percent since 2015 and will apparently continue to drop heading forward.

While the competition to get listed organically keeps heating up, SEO professionals need to up their game in 2018 in order to survive.

Here is where learning which principles are working right now may help you out — provided you can figure out how to combine them to your website’s benefit.

Fundamental Principles of SEO Today

1. Links Still Rule

Links have been important from the earliest days of SEO and are still one of the strongest indicators of a website’s superb performance to Google.

The more high-quality, relevant links you acquire, the higher your website’s SERPs will potentially become.

In short, links are still fundamental to SEO.

It makes sense to invest in link building as part of your SEO efforts.

2. Relevant, Optimized Content Wins

The links vs. content problem is somewhat like a chicken-or-egg dilemma.

You need content to attract links, but your content needs links to boost your site’s ranking in search results and to help drive traffic to a content piece.

Eventually, what it comes down to is this: Links and content are the backbone of SEO.

If you want to crack the first page on Google, you need links to your relevant, well-optimized content.

Here are some things to bear in mind when crafting and optimizing your content:

  • Keywords matter in context. Keywords are still of strong relevance to Google, but instead of scanning the page for “keyword appearance,” its crawlers now analyze the context and related secondary keywords that share the searcher’s intent.
  • Titles, meta descriptions, ALT attributes, H1 tags, and URLs are still important. Include targeted and relevant keywords in these elements.
  • Increase your expertise, authority, and trust (E-A-T). Read Google’s search quality guidelines for guidance on content quality. Google states, in part, that “the amount of content necessary for the page to be satisfying depends on the topic and purpose of the page.”

In short, establish a process to produce and share high-quality, optimized content. Ensure that all content is written for humans, yet optimized to feed data to search engines.

3. UX Signals Have an Impact on SERPs

User experience (UX) plays a substantial role in how your website does with the search engines.

Unfortunately, user experience depends on too many factors (e.g., site infrastructure and layout, content, etc.), and is often too hard to measure.

Figuring out where your site lacks from a UX perspective can be a painful experience. Thus, some SEO pros choose not to deal with it whatsoever.

Spy on Any Website’s Analytics Account
See their sales and how they get them, in real time. Insights you were never meant to see.

Yet, if you want to win your SEO game in 2018, mastering UX is what you need. You can partially outsource the design and layout parts of the process, but you will still have to:

  • Ensure that dwell time and CTR are high, and bounce rate is low.While these signals have been around for some time, and Google does not use them as direct ranking factors, optimizing your site for high engagement can’t hurt and could even help indirectly.
  • Improve site architecture. The key part here is to improve a website’s navigation and make sure that search engines can crawl all the pages, and users can easily find a page that they are looking for. “The simpler, the better” approach works perfectly here.
  • Optimize for speed. Regardless of the platform, your site has to load in 2 seconds or less. Image compression, code and structure optimizations, and faster servers will help.
  • Attract a UX professional to optimize customer journey in line with user intent. Since SEO has evolved to become more user-focused, you should work together with UX people to provide great digital experiencesat each stage of a customer’s journey. In other words, your goal is conversions and sales, not just traffic and leads.

In short, UX optimization has already become a fundamental part of SEO.

Focusing on the visitor will likely play even more important role in the future (since Google becomes smarter and clearly improves for a user’s sake), and you need to learn at least the basics of it.

4. Mobile SEO Can Make or Break It

As Google is determined to use its mobile-first index to rank and display search results on all devices, it is time to finally polish your website, mobile-wise.

Unfortunately, although Google’s move makes sense (with more than 50 percent of traffic worldwide generated on mobile), making your site perform smoothly on both mobile and desktop is not simple.

To begin with, you will have to invest in a responsive design, since Google recommends it.

You will also have to make your content consistent across desktop and mobile devices, and ensure your website is fast and easy to use.

What it all means:

  • Optimize your content for mobile users.
  • Accelerate your page speed.
  • Enhance mobile-friendliness.

In short, you will need to up your mobile game or you’ll find yourself ranking poorly on Google.

5. Voice Search Is Already a Thing

Although I do not believe that voice search will revolutionize SEO in the near future, customers seem to love it.

Northstar Research reports that 55 percent of U.S. teens and 41 percent of U.S. adults use voice search.

According to Google, more than 20 percent of all mobile searches are voice searches.

With that said, it makes sense to start optimizing for voice search now.

Specifically, you can start with these steps:

In short, while voice search optimization is not a must-have right now, related optimizations make sense and can help you own more Google real estate.

Combine and Experiment Through Trial-and-Error

SEO success most often comes from best practices plus some trial and error.

Nowadays, the fundamental principles described above are for you to combine and experiment.

Unfortunately, SEO rules are not carved in stone. The rules and tactics change and evolve all the time.

There is no universal SEO formula; only trial and error can help you determine which SEO methods work and which do not for your particular website in your particular niche, at a particular moment in time.

The secret of SEO is simple:

You must learn how to combine and experiment with multiple methods, and then analyze the results, bearing in mind that all your work may go to waste due to Google’s latest algorithm update or what your competitors are doing.

In the process, you sift out well-performing tactics, while cutting out those that do not work anymore. Then, rinse and repeat.

In doing so, you will never end up with a linear SEO strategy which, however successful for a short period of time, can prove dangerous in a matter of days. Google is usually pretty quick to figure out when someone discovers a way to cheat their algorithms.

Conclusion

SEO is a never-ending, ever-evolving, multidimensional science. Every SEO would love to find the magic formula that could once and for all explain how SEO works, with specific rules and concrete equations on the table.

Unfortunately, SEO is too complex to fit into a template. Although it does evolve around principles and certain rules, its inner workings are all about analyzing and applying tactics that work and sifting out tactics that do not.

Bear this in mind, and keep a close eye on your competitors, and you will definitely succeed in search results. This is how SEO works, and will continue to work, until the process is completely outsourced to AI.

Source: searchenginejournal.com ~ By: Sergey Grybniak ~ Image: Pixabay

3 Steps To Take To Start Freelancing

The majority of the U.S. workforce will be freelancers by 2027. That mind-blowing prediction comes from the new Freelancing in America: 2017 report, conducted by the Edelman Intelligence research firm and commissioned by the Upwork freelancing platform and Freelancers Union.

Odds are, you’ll want to know how to become a freelancer, either full-time or part-time and either as a side gig while you’re holding down a full-time job or as a way of earning income in retirement. I’ll offer three suggestions in a minute.

The Freelancing in America: 2017 study surveyed 6,000 U.S. workers (freelancers and non-freelancers) to analyze the growing freelance economy and the role it plays in the future of work.

Of course, no survey can predict exactly how many people will be working on a temporary, contract or project basis 10 years from now. And even determining how many people freelance today is tough; statistics on the freelance economy are notoriously elusive. But this report’s findings leave little doubt that we are rapidly barreling towards a freelance-based workplace — and the sooner you prepare for that shift, the better.

A few fascinating findings from Freelancing in America 2017:

  • The U.S. freelance workforce has grown three times faster than the overall U.S. workforce since 2014. Currently, 36% of the workforce is freelancing.
  • Although freelancers skew younger, many in their 50s and 60s are freelancing, too. About half of freelancers are Millennials; roughly 28% of workers in their 50s and 60s are.
  • More freelancers are doing it full-time these days, not as a way to supplement their income. Over the last three years, the number of full-time freelancers increased by 12 percentage points, to 29%, while the percentage of moonlighters and part-time freelancers fell. And 63% of freelancers started freelancing more out of choice than necessity (that’s up 10 points since 2014).
  • Freelancers are doing well financially. Nearly 2/3 of freelancers surveyed said they now make more than they did when they had an employer. That’s up 10 percentage points since 2014. Of those who earn more now than before, 75% said that happened within the first year of freelancing. The survey found that 36% of freelancers now earn $75,000 or more. Notably, half of freelancers claim they wouldn’t even consider a traditional job, no matter how much money was offered.
  • Technology is making it easier to find freelance work online. Nearly 3/4 of the freelancers surveyed said they found work online this past year, up 5 points from the year prior. In short: As technology has improved and companies continue to outsource work, freelancing is becoming a more acceptable, enjoyable and desirable way to work.

Credit: Edelman Intelligence

This doesn’t mean freelancing is a perfect work solution, though. The triple whammy of unpredictable work assignments, fluctuating cash flow and the challenge of securing and paying for health insurance is still a major obstacle for many freelancers (although most freelancers surveyed believe the Affordable Care Act has helped them and prefer Congress keep it). Worth noting: 63% of full-time freelancers dip into their savings at least once a month; just 20% of full-time non-freelancers do.

So how can you best prepare for the possibility that you may be freelancing at some point? Here are three tips culled from the survey results:

1. Update your skills regularly. If the last time you learned a new skill or technology was over six months ago, you’re losing ground. An impressive 55% of freelancers updated their skills in the last six months; by contrast, only 30% of non-freelancers did.

So before year-end, make it a priority to take advantage of any company-sponsored training, workshops or tuition reimbursement you can get. If that’s not an option, look into online courses and community college offerings for affordable training options.

Incidentally, Money and PayScale just came out with a list of the “25 highest-paying side hustles,” which might suggest skills you’d want to learn. The top five, based on hourly pay and assuming doing the work four or five hours a week: disc jockey ($65.70 per hour); musician or singer ($43.40 per hour); photographer ($36.20 per hour); makeup artist ($34.00 per hour) and piano teacher ($31.20 per hour).

Three others in the Top 25: tutor (No. 11; $20.10 per hour); delivery driver (No. 16; $14.30 per hour) and dog walker (No. 17; $12.80 per hour).

2. Seek out work assignments that diversify your capabilities and make you more valuable. You may now have a job that seems automation-proof, but nearly half of freelancers say robots and artificial intelligence have already impacted their work. And 77% of full-time freelancers expect at least some of their work will be done by robots or machies within 20 years.

You just never know how or when technology might encroach on your job. Whenever possible, look for opportunities to take on responsibilities or even side gigs that diversify your skill-base, industry expertise or technology prowess.

3. Step up your networking, both online and off. While freelancers are finding more work online, their biggest source of leads are family and friends, followed by professional contacts (81% combined). That percentage mirrors the oft-quoted statistic that 80% of new jobs are found through networking. Regardless of whether you go out on your own, you’re well served to make networking a priority.

The survey also listed social media as the third most popular source of leads for freelancers. That’s a helpful reminder to take at least a few minutes each week and check in with your professional network on LinkedIn or Twitter. You never know when those connections might lead to an exciting new opportunity, perhaps in your future life as a freelancer.

Source: forbes.com ~ BY:  Nancy Collamer ~ Image: pixabay.com

The Future of Work: Freelancing Goes From Rags to Riches

With the current global spend on contingent workers reaching over $3 trillion, opportunity abounds for all parties.

In 2015, the current global spend on contingent workers was over $3 trillion with nearly 70 percent of that being independent contractors and freelancers (seen as highly skilled professional workers).

And, by various estimates, 20-33 percent of today’s US workforce now comprises of freelancers, contractors and temps, up from six percent in 1989. Worldwide, companies now spend an estimated $300 billion dollars per year on such contingent labor. There are now large United States-based conglomerates that spend upwards of $80 million in contingent labor alone per year to keep the lights on in their businesses and to maintain competitive advantage.

Economists project that the extended workforce will continue to increase as part of a long-term trend and there are important conversations to be had about how that affects the economy, U.S. businesses and the workers themselves in the long run.

Workers can sit back and worry about how things are changing, or they can take action and drive their careers forward. There are currently four clear options for American workers.

1. Maintain a Salaried Job

A job for life is an antiquated terms these days. It is rare for people to stay in a single job from the time of graduation through to retirement age, no matter how good you are or how hard you work. Economies demand efficiency and better, stronger and faster resources seem to win. That being said, we are seeing an upward trend for workers staying with some jobs for longer, especially for the younger generation.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, for 25-34 year old workers the average tenure at a job was was 3.2 years in 2012, up from 2.7 years in 2002. This is still true today and is partly due to the recent recession (2008). As the U.S. gets stronger financially and more opportunities arise, we will likely see tenure dropping due to the rise of multiple salaried job workers or hybrid salaried/freelance workers. While this is not a job for life, it certainly is a job for a few years, and that is good.

These are the hybrid salaried/freelance workers, and this is the most likely future for many Americans. People are starting to see the opportunities to follow passion projects and even turn them into reality. No longer are people constrained by lack of funds, or even lack of time.

Brian Chesky, CEO of AirBNB puts this very well, “Now we’re living in a world where people can become businesses in 60 seconds.” And, it’s true. We are more connected than ever and we can grab our smartphones and a credit card and get going.

Start Projects on the Side

These days, on-demand freelancing, and crowdsourcing platforms, like Freelancer.com, let you post projects to build apps, ecommerce website, hire virtual assistants and even do the accounting quickly and easily without the constraints of the local workforce and availability. That means the day job can carry on while the dreams are being built in the background. It’s like being a mini-entrepreneur, or solo-preneur as some like to say.

Having a second source of income, from a fun project is always going to make people feel more satisfied and that can even have a positive effect on their day jobs as well.

2. Go Freelance

In 2014, the US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics stated that 2 million Americans are leaving their jobs every week. Some end up at new jobs, however, many are choosing to forge their own path forward. Freelancing platforms have become increasingly streamlined to allow for real-time communications and freelancers can browse thousands of jobs every day.

There was a time when being a freelancer was seen as a risky proposition and a second-class worker in companies. In 2014 the Freelancer’s Union found that 65 percent said freelancing as a career path is more respected today than it was three years ago. With this acceptance comes growth, both personally and with the economy. Companies are growing stronger by hiring these contingent workers.

3. Become the next UBER, Facebook or AirBNB

All of the aforementioned companies worked hard over years to build technologies and then grow their businesses. They received funding early and built on successes they had. Although they are now seen as the unicorns, that does not mean you cannot get going to prove out your idea.

In the U.S. alone, Freelancer.com has over 2 million registered users that are across all major cities—NYC, Chicago, Atalanta, San Francisco, LA, Boston, Seattle—and everywhere inbetween. There are freelancers with over 850 different skills, from mobile app development to engineering, and from accountancy to 3D printing to even more complex tasks like quantum mathematics, VR development and mobile games. They can be called up with your smartphone in a few seconds and your idea can become a reality in minutes, hours and days.

This paves the way for bold ideas and confidence that experimentation with business may not lead to bankruptcy for fledgling businesses. In fact, 42 percent of founders cited a “lack of capital” as their biggest obstacle to growth in 2015, up from about 35 percent the previous year, according to Mainsail Partners, a private-equity firm that works primarily with bootstrapped businesses.

Now it takes just hundreds of dollars to get a business running and get online and only thousands of dollars each year to hire teams across the world for core business functions like business development, support, customer care, accounting, design and data analysis.

Sound too good to be true? Many companies have become multi-million (or even billion) dollar businesses. Whatsapp’s early technical team was even found on these platforms and they have certainly done well.

There are the options and opportunities. Even if you have a small idea for something you’ve always wanted to do then just do it. Maybe it’ll be the next unicorn and you can be the next CEO that everyone is talking about.

Source: business.com ~ By: NIK BADMINTON ~Image: pixabay.com