IsaGenesis: Plant-Based Ingredients for Youthful Aging

Aging is an inevitable part of life, but how you age is something you can exert some control over.

From regular physical activity to nourishing and caring for your body, healthy choices can play a beneficial role in the aging process. Beyond a healthy lifestyle, research has pinpointed specific herbs and nutrients that can support more youthful aging, specifically through the protection of your telomeres.

What Are Telomeres?

Telomeres are the protective DNA sequences at the end of each chromosome. They are essential to maintaining genome stability within the cells, and researchers have honed in on telomeres as a marker of biological aging.

Over time, our telomeres begin to gradually shorten, which is naturally associated with normal aging. Early telomere shortening is linked to lifestyle factors such as poor diet, stress, and exposure to environmental toxins, which can lead to negative consequences for health (1-5).

Think of telomeres like the plastic caps on the end of your shoelaces. With time, they will inevitably get worn down. If you take care of your shoes, you can protect your shoelaces from splitting and fraying faster than they naturally would.

Why IsaGenesis?

A growing body of scientific literature suggests that antioxidant nutrients along with select plant extracts and herbal ingredients can support telomeres and defend against the harmful effects of oxidative stress known to accelerate the cellular aging process (6).

For those wishing to maintain a youthful energy and vitality, IsaGenesis® provides a unique blend of antioxidants and phytonutrient-rich herbal ingredients. These ingredients reinforce the body’s own defenses against oxidative stress and free radicals that can accelerate the effects of aging.

  1. Milk thistle — Milk thistle contains compounds including silymarin with demonstrated liver-supporting and free-radical defense properties (6-8).
  2. Ashwagandha — This popular herb has been used for centuries in Ayurvedic medicine and is known for its benefits in supporting the body’s ability to adapt to stress (9, 10).
  3. Horny goat weed —This botanical ingredient supports healthy aging through different mechanisms, including support for immune and endocrine systems and benefits for metabolism and organ function (11-16).
  4. Grape seed extract — Grape seed extract has a high concentration of polyphenol flavonoids, which have been shown to support parameters related to heart health and normal platelet function (17-21).
  5. Turmeric — This popular curry spice contains curcumin and other related curcuminoid phytonutrients that have benefits for brain and immune health along with support free radical defenses in the body (22, 23).
  6. Giant knotweed — Giant knotweed is a natural source of the potent phytonutrient resveratrol, also found in red wine, that provides and immune system support and has been linked with benefits for healthy aging (24-26).
  7. Pomegranate — This fruit has significant beneficial properties related to its natural polyphenol content. It has been linked to benefits for heart health, metabolism, and detoxification systems (27-29).
  8. White, green, and black tea — Various types of tea leaves contain biologically active compounds associated with many health benefits, including support for cognitive function and the circulatory system (30-33).
  9. Asian ginseng — Shown to help support normal metabolism and circulation as well as healthy immune response (34, 35).
  10. Bilberry — Provides support for cognitive function and the brain’s response to oxidative stress (36-41).

Additionally, vitamin C (ascorbic acid) and B12 (as a mix of methylcobalamin and cyanocobalamin) help combat oxidative stress and support normal metabolism. Vitamin C plays a role in developing and maintaining a healthy antioxidant status (42, 43). Adequate vitamin B12 is essential to maintain normal blood homocysteine levels. Elevated blood homocysteine is a known risk factor for oxidative stress (44, 45).

IsaGenesis Proven Effective Through Research

Catalase is a powerful protective enzyme naturally produced by cells that is key to defending against cellular damage caused by harmful, free-radical generating peroxides. Supporting the body’s defense against oxidative stress helps maintain normal telomere function and mitigates many of the factors that contribute to premature telomere shortening (1-5).

In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, researchers observed a 15% increase in catalase levels in participants who supplemented with IsaGenesis, compared to participants who received a placebo.

This clinical trial demonstrates that IsaGenesis supports the body’s natural defense against oxidative stress by significantly increasing catalase levels in healthy adults.

How To Use IsaGenesis

The unique blend of ingredients in IsaGenesis naturally lend itself to supporting healthy aging. But, IsaGenesis is not just for older adults. The herbal and plant-based ingredients found in IsaGenesis are beneficial for many functions of health and wellness and recommended for anyone over the age 18.

Taking two IsaGenesis capsules twice daily or as part of the Complete Essentials™ Daily Packs With IsaGenesis is the best way to provide your body with this blend of ingredients you can’t find anywhere else.

References

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  2. Freitas-Simoes TM, Ros E, Sala-Vila A. Nutrients, foods, dietary patterns and telomere length: Update of epidemiological studies and randomized trials. Metabolism. 2016 Apr;65(4):406-15.
  3. Wolkowitz OM et al. Leukocyte Telomere Length in Major Depression: Correlations with Chronicity, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress-Preliminary Findings. PLoS One 2011; 6(3):e17837.
  4. Cassidy A et al. Associations between diet, lifestyle factors, and telomere length in women. Am J Clin Nutr 2010;91:1273-80.
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  6. Sweazea KL, Johnston CS, Knurick J, Bliss CD. Plant-Based Nutraceutical Increases Plasma Catalase Activity in Healthy Participants: A Small Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Proof of Concept Trial. J Diet Suppl 2016;0,0:1-14.
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  8. Soto C et al. Silymarin increases antioxidant enzymes in alloxan-induced diabetes in rat pancreas. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. C Toxicol. Pharmacol 2003;136:205–212.
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Source: isagenixhealth.net

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